Ozone, a Brief Introduction

Ozone, a Brief Introduction

 

Ozone was discovered in 1785 by Dutch physicist Martinus Van Marum, who smelled a peculiar sent which was being made near electrostatic machines. It was later synthesized, and in 1857 the first Ozone insufflations were tested on animals and humans. Since then, it has spread all across the world for many different purposes. Ozone therapy has a long history and many scientific studies performed to back up its validity.

Russia has recognized ozone therapy on a state level for medical use as well as for dermatological purposes!  According to the Ministry of Public Health in Cuba, ozone therapy has been applied all throughout the country since 2009.

Altogether, there are over 26,000 ozone therapists throughout the world. With wide acceptance, many studies, and numerous practitioners, we have learned a great deal about how to use ozone.

There are a variety of ways in which ozone therapy can be administered to the patient. How do you know which one to use? In the following blog posts, I will be going over the different methods of applying ozone. In this one, however, I am going to be giving you an overview of all of them.

 

 

 

Major Autohemotherapy

 

Major autohaemotherapy calls for the 10-250 ml of the patient’s blood to be drawn out. Ozone is then injected into the blood and the ozonated blood is re-introduced into a vein. These methods have been used to treat a wide variety of health problems. It is probably the most commonly used method of administration for ozone therapy today.

 

Minor Autohemotherapy

 

Minor autohaemotherapy involves using a syringe to remove a small amount of the patient’s blood from a vein with a syringe. The blood is then treated with an equal amount of ozone and given back to the patient as an intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. The blood and ozone becomes a type of auto-vaccine, which can be very specific and effective.

 

Direct intra-arterial and intravenous application (DIV)

An ozone/oxygen mixture is slowly injected into an artery or vein with a hypodermic syringe. Though not recommended by many within the ozone therapy world due to the danger of creating an embolism, this method is used primarily for arterial circulatory disorders.

 

Insufflation

Ozone is applied through the rectum and absorbed into the body through the intestine. Used for a wide variety of health problems, this method is considered one of the safest.

 

Ozonated water

This method calls for ozone gas to be bubbled through distilled water or saline.  The water is used externally to bathe wounds, burns and slow-healing skin infections.

 

Intra-articular injection (prolozone)

In this method, a specific mixture of procaine, vitamins, minerals and homeopathic remedies are injected directly into the joints. Ozone is also injected to the same site. It is used primarily by physicians throughout the world to treat joint pain, herniated discs, arthritis, and other joint diseases.

 

Intramammary infusion 

Instead of antibiotics, this can be very effective for mastitis in large animals.  The lack of side effects or residue in animals such as dairy cows makes it a perfect choice as it will not affect the quality of their milk as an antibiotic would.  

 

Limb bagging

This non-invasive method uses a specially made plastic bag that is placed around the area to be treated. Ozone is pumped into the bag and absorbed into the body through the skin.

 

Ozonated oil

Used primarily to treat skin problems, ozone gas is added to olive, hemp, sunflower or other oils and applied as a balm or salve for long term, low-dose exposure. Studies show a more rapid healing effect. 

 

Inhalation of ozone

Ozone can be bubbled through olive oil and the resulting atomized oil/ozone mix can be safely inhaled

 

You’ll want to watch out for our next blog which will be going over the differences between major and minor autohemotherapy.

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